Welcome

Greetings from Associate Dean Chung

Research is a key component of the academic program at Washington University School of Medicine (WUSM).  WUSM is an internationally recognized institution where an outstanding faculty directs compassionate patient care and world-class research.  Although the medical students come to WUSM for the superb clinical training the school offers, approximately 95 percent of the students also conduct research during their time here.  Research provides medical students with the opportunity to engage in scientific inquiry.

The research activities listed below are an integral part of the medical school curriculum and educational training for our WUSM medical students.

The vast size and broad scope of the research activities at WUSM provide many opportunities for medical students to pursue any type of modern medical research.  Our academic research programs are as follows: first year medical students conduct part-time research during the school year with a maximum of 10 hr/wk; after first year, medical students conduct full-time research during the summer and receive a modest stipend for living expenses; second and third year medical students conduct part-time research during the school year with a maximum of 10 hr/wk; fourth year medical students conduct full-time research for 6-12 weeks during the school year and receive credit.  Medical students can also conduct full-time research in one of the yearlong research programs (YRP) during their medical school years.  The YRP includes: the Master’s Degree Program for Medical Students (MA/MD), the Master of Science in Clinical Investigation (MSCI), the One-Year Research without Degree (MD5), the Master of Population Health Sciences (MPHS), and the Master of Public Health (MPH).  The academic research programs prepare the medical students for careers in academic medicine.

Sincerely,

Koong-Nah Chung, PhD

Associate Dean for Medical Student Research
Director of the Office of Medical Student Research
Instructor of Cell Biology and Physiology
Washington University School of Medicine